Shoulder sore after steroid injection

Hi Christine and everyone on this post! I just had arthroscopic surgery last Monday and my Dr. said it was the worst inflammation of the bicep that he has ever seen. He removed the inflammation and did some manipulation of the arm. I had a neuro blocker, so I was grateful when I woke up and felt nothing for 24 hours. Well, when the blocker wore off, boy, was it painful! It’s been a week now but I still feel a lot of pain, the area where they put the block is really sore, my shoulder is constantly throbbing in pain. I had to stop the Percocet because it was making me drowsy during the day and still not cutting the pain. They switched me to Tramadol, it felt the same. Now I am just taking 3 Aleve, twice a day. Nothing seems to help the pain. Does anyone have any other suggestions for pain meds. My Dr. said the Tramadol was the last thing he could recommend. I feel like I am constantly wearing a pain look on my face, feel miserable. On the flip side, I am now able to raise my arm high up during PT, and to the side, but still far from hooking my bra or putting my arm anywhere near my back. I’m so frustrated, feel like crying most of the time. I just can’t believe how painful this tendonitis/frozen shoulder is! I’ve always been athletic, and this has really aged me and made me feel so vulnerable to do anything. Even going for a walk, I’m terrified that I’ll slip and fall onto my left shoulder, or someone bumping into my shoulder……sigh. Will this nightmare EVER END?

Shoulder pain is relatively common and has a variety of causes, ranging from a simple muscle pull to a dislocated joint. The reason why the shoulder is so susceptible to injury is that it has the most range of motion of any joint in the body. [1] Furthermore, shoulder pain sometimes originates from other areas of the body such as the neck, mid back or even the heart. In most cases, using common sense and following some simple home remedies will be enough to stop your shoulder pain, but in some cases, treatment from a health professional is necessary.

The upshot? Is your ankle sore after walking, running, or performing other activities? If so, you need to have the stability of your ankle ligaments checked. You should be able to avoid surgery as loose ligaments can be tightened nonsurgically now. How? Using advanced interventional orthopedics . In our experience, advanced platelet rich plasma injections performed under precise imaging guidance can help tighten lax ligaments. If the damage is greater, stem cell injections may be the answer. But get it done sooner rather than later, before a more serious issue sets in.

Hi Dan,
Avery here in Florida now approaching 6 wks post-op repair of complete supraspinatus tear, partial tear of subscapularis and a biceps tenodesis. I am 65 and in very good health but my orthopedist says my supraspinatus was poor quality tissue–tried 9 suture-anchors but could only get 6 in place. So I was surprised he told me to get out of Breg pillow-sling after 4 wks as opposed to 6. Began PT 2X/wk at 4 wks doing the usual passive exercises 3X per day at home, including recent addition of pulley for flexion. Since I have a startle awakening about one hour after going to sleep, and because my tendon quality is poor, I want to protect my repair at least to 6wks during the day and longer at night. Some docs want patients in sling (w/o the pillow) for up to 3 months until active PT phase is complete. One wk ago I actually rolled off my bed onto my surgical side but Xray and Sx suggest no harm, though the buckle on the pillow fractured a rib when I hit the wood floor with rug.
Four questions: 1. Do you concur with my PT that I should stay in sling 6wks given the above, and longer at night since I tend to jump up during bad dreams—and with or w/o the neutral pillow? Recall the orthopedist said to ditch the sling at 4 wks while some say to wear the basic sling w/o pillow til active phase of PT is over at about12 wks postop).
2. My ortho doc advised PT to avoid subscapularis though I assume he meant active for now. Passive shoulder flexion stretches that tendon. 4. When one comes out of sling at night, what should be position of arm—straight along side or across the chest?

Shoulder sore after steroid injection

shoulder sore after steroid injection

Hi Dan,
Avery here in Florida now approaching 6 wks post-op repair of complete supraspinatus tear, partial tear of subscapularis and a biceps tenodesis. I am 65 and in very good health but my orthopedist says my supraspinatus was poor quality tissue–tried 9 suture-anchors but could only get 6 in place. So I was surprised he told me to get out of Breg pillow-sling after 4 wks as opposed to 6. Began PT 2X/wk at 4 wks doing the usual passive exercises 3X per day at home, including recent addition of pulley for flexion. Since I have a startle awakening about one hour after going to sleep, and because my tendon quality is poor, I want to protect my repair at least to 6wks during the day and longer at night. Some docs want patients in sling (w/o the pillow) for up to 3 months until active PT phase is complete. One wk ago I actually rolled off my bed onto my surgical side but Xray and Sx suggest no harm, though the buckle on the pillow fractured a rib when I hit the wood floor with rug.
Four questions: 1. Do you concur with my PT that I should stay in sling 6wks given the above, and longer at night since I tend to jump up during bad dreams—and with or w/o the neutral pillow? Recall the orthopedist said to ditch the sling at 4 wks while some say to wear the basic sling w/o pillow til active phase of PT is over at about12 wks postop).
2. My ortho doc advised PT to avoid subscapularis though I assume he meant active for now. Passive shoulder flexion stretches that tendon. 4. When one comes out of sling at night, what should be position of arm—straight along side or across the chest?

Media:

shoulder sore after steroid injectionshoulder sore after steroid injectionshoulder sore after steroid injectionshoulder sore after steroid injectionshoulder sore after steroid injection

http://buy-steroids.org