New steroid nasal spray

In rabbits, fetal weight reduction and cleft palate were observed at a fluticasone propionate dose approximately times the MRHDID for adults (on a mg/m² basis at a maternal subcutaneous dose of 4 mcg/kg/day). However, no teratogenic effects were reported at fluticasone propionate doses up to approximately 20 times the MRHDID for adults (on a mg/m² basis at a maternal oral dose up to 300 mcg/kg/day). No fluticasone propionate was detected in the plasma in this study, consistent with the established low bioavailability following oral administration [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY ].

Controlled clinical studies have shown that intranasal corticosteroids may cause a reduction in growth velocity in pediatric patients. This effect has been observed in the absence of laboratory evidence of HPA axis suppression, suggesting that growth velocity is a more sensitive indicator of systemic corticosteroid exposure in pediatric patients than some commonly used tests of HPA axis function. The long-term effects of this reduction in growth velocity associated with intranasal corticosteroids, including the impact on final adult height, are unknown. The potential for “catch-up” growth following discontinuation of treatment with intranasal corticosteroids has not been adequately studied. The growth of pediatric patients receiving intranasal corticosteroids, including DYMISTA, should be monitored routinely (., via stadiometry). The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against the clinical benefits obtained and the risks/benefits of treatment alternatives.

Azelastine hydrochloride displayed no sensitising potential in the guinea pig. Azelastine demonstrated no genotoxic potential in a battery of in vitro and in vivo tests, nor any carcinogenic potential in rats or mice. In male and female rats, azelastine at oral doses greater than 3 mg/kg/day caused a dose-related decrease in the fertility index; no substance-related alterations were found in the reproductive organs of males or females during chronic toxicity studies, however, embryotoxic and teratogenic effects in rats, mice and rabbits occurred only at maternal toxic doses (for example, skeletal malformations were observed in rats and mice at doses of mg/kg/day).

Mortuaire, G., de Gabory, L., François, M., Massé, G., Bloch, F., Brion, N., ... Serrano, E. Rebound congestion and rhinitis medicamentosa: Nasal decongestants in clinical practice. (2013, June 1). Critical review of the literature by a medical panel. European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases , 130(3), 137-144. Retrieved from https:///#!/content/playContent/1--S1879729612001378?returnurl=http:%2F%%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS1879729612001378%3Fshowall%3Dtrue&referrer=https:%2F%2F .

There are no data with intranasal fluticasone furoate in patients with hepatic impairment. Data are available following inhaled administration of fluticasone furoate (as fluticasone furoate or fluticasone furoate/vilanterol) to subjects with hepatic impairment that are also applicable for intranasal dosing. A study of a single 400 microgram dose of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B) resulted in increased C max (42 %) and AUC(0-∞) (172 %) and a modest (on average 23 %) decrease in cortisol levels in patients compared to healthy subjects. Following repeat dosing of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate/vilanterol for 7 days, there was an increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure (on average two-fold as measured by AUC (0–24) ) in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) compared with healthy subjects. The increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 200/25 micrograms) was associated with an average 34% reduction in serum cortisol compared with healthy subjects. There was no effect on serum cortisol in subjects with severe hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 100/ micrograms). Based on these findings the average predicted exposure of 110 micrograms of intranasal fluticasone furoate in this patient population would not be expected to result in suppression of cortisol.

New steroid nasal spray

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Mortuaire, G., de Gabory, L., François, M., Massé, G., Bloch, F., Brion, N., ... Serrano, E. Rebound congestion and rhinitis medicamentosa: Nasal decongestants in clinical practice. (2013, June 1). Critical review of the literature by a medical panel. European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases , 130(3), 137-144. Retrieved from https:///#!/content/playContent/1--S1879729612001378?returnurl=http:%2F%%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS1879729612001378%3Fshowall%3Dtrue&referrer=https:%2F%2F .

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